We totally understand that making the move from disposable period products to reusable ones can feel daunting and you probably have a few questions…. We’ve put our heads together to try and answer the most commonly asked questions so hopefully you’ll find everything you need right here. If not, ping us an email and we’ll make sure it makes the list!

 

General FAQs

Mooncup have an advice line run by qualified medical health professionals – they’re happy to answer any questions/ work through problems with usage: advice@mooncup.co.uk or +44(0) 1273 673 845

Lunette: Lunette has a very good and responsive customer service so you can email them anytime at info@lunette.com.

There are also lots of useful information in their FAQs and blog. There are also loads of blogs, youtube videos and forums on this topic so google your question!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Like with any internal period product, there is a risk of TSS. But a clean, properly used menstrual cup means the chances are very small. Take good care of personal hygiene and always choose a trusted brand.

TSS is an infection caused by bacteria entering through wounds or mucous membrane. It is an extremely rare, potentially fatal disease occurring in those with or without a uterus, and children. TSS is usually connected with absorbent tampons.

SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:

  • sudden high fever
  • sore throat
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • dizziness
  • a rash resembling sunburn
  • muscle aches
  • fainting or blackouts

Early recognition and cure is vital, so if you have some of the symptoms mentioned above, remove the menstrual cup immediately, contact your doctor and express your concerns about the possibility of TSS.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes! Because menstrual cups don’t dry you out like tampons you can even do a ‘dry-run’ before your period starts if you like!

Here’s some tips from Lunette about first time use: https://www.lunette.com/blogs/news/teens-menstrual-cups-tips-for-first-time-use?p64=4

Category: Menstrual Cups

This will vary from brand to brand and depends on how well you take care of the cup. Some people will use their cup for up to 10 years and others prefer to change it yearly. Some discolouration is normal because blood is quite strong, but with good cleaning you can minimize this.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes you should properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

If you’re unable to boil your cup (some brands don’t recommend boiling anyway) then a sterilising tablet in a foldable cup (or any other cup/bowl) will do the job just as well:
https://www.nomoretaboo.org/store/RubyCup-Foldable-Steriliser-Cup-p60272081

Category: Menstrual Cups

Silicon is fairly inert and not associated with hormone disruption, unlike the additives in plastic and other chemicals and residues found in mainstream pads and tampons.

Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because of its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up. It’s very important that the cup is regularly and thoroughly washed using mechanical action to remove any biofilm from the surface.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes, you can. If you do use an IUD, consult with your doctor about cutting the strings as short as possible and monitor their length regularly during periods. If the strings seem longer than normal, it might be a sign that your IUD has moved.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Can I use a menstrual cup if my uterus has an unusual tilt or I have a low cervix?

The cervix is usually high in the vagina and the menstrual cup is placed low so the cervix remains above the cup. For many people, the cervix descends after giving birth; for others, it is simply situated low in the vagina. If you have a low cervix it may enter the interior of the cup which makes it more prone to leak. In some users, the cervix fits best inside the menstrual cup but for others the cup may exert pressure on the cervix that can cause discomfort and even pain.

The best way to evaluate the position of your cervix is by observing leakage — if you have experienced leakage even when the cup has been opened, make sure that the cup is significantly lower than the cervix.

If you haven’t experienced leakage and you have not located the cervix, there’s no need to hunt for it! You’re a woman whose cervix is so deep in the vagina that it doesn’t affect the use of the menstrual cup in any way.

If you have a titled uterus the cup may also be tilted, causing it to leak a little. Here is a video from Lunette about how to make sure your cup is its place!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes absolutely!

A menstrual cup is worn internally (and you don’t have that rogue tampon string to worry about!) and holds more volume than tampon.

Category: Menstrual Cups

No!

Category: Menstrual Cups

If your flow is very heavy or your cervix hangs very low when you’re menstruating you may find that the cup leaks a little. Leaks are more frequent for women whose cervix’ move lower during menstruation or if the cup has been inserted too high in the vagina, next to the cervix, or above it.

Remember to make sure the suction air holes are clear before reinserting your cup each time. Rotating the cup a couple of times will make sure that the cup has unfolded inside you.

To catch any small leaks you might want to wear a reusable pad or period pants in conjunction with the cup, especially when you’re trying it for the first few months and you’re still learning about your flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Cups can be messy when you start learning to use them, but once you’ve mastered the technique and worked out what’s best for you you can avoid any leaks or spills.

If your flow is heavy, you may find that blood pools in the bottom of the loo when you empty your cup, even after you’ve flushed. Use a toilet brush and flush again, and the red water should go!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Make sure your hands are clean and bring a reusable water bottle into the toilet with you so you can rinse your cup off if there’s no sink. You can also buy cup wipes but it’s not advised to use normal soap.

If you’re out for a shorter period of time wipe your cup clean with toilet paper or use a special disinfectant wipe like these: https://store.lunette.com/products/lunette-cupwipes.

Properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Menstrual cups should be cleaned before and after your cycle as well as rinsed after emptying.

Read the instructions that come with your cup – some will suggest boiling in a saucepan for between 5-10 minutes whereas others advise using sterilising tablets or cup cleanser.

Using normal soap is not advised because of the pH, the oils and the lack of a thorough clean in the nooks and crannies of the cup.

Category: Menstrual Cups

When you first start using the cup empty it every few hours and you’ll soon get an idea of how heavy your flow is and how often you’ll need to empty it. If your flow is very heavy you may need to empty it every couple of hours. If your flow is lighter, you may find you can go as long as 6-8 hours.

The capacity of a menstrual cup is usually 25 ml or 30 ml whereas the absorbing capacity of a tampon is 6-18 g.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Don’t worry! You’re not getting anything stuck in there. Removing your menstrual cup can be tricky at first, but we promise it will come naturally after a few tries.

Relax. Use your pelvic floor muscles to push down until you can get a firm grip on the stem of the cup.

Break the seal by pinching the bottom part of the cup until you feel or hear the suction release. Then, gently rock the cup from side to side while pulling down. Make sure that you do not pull the cup out by the tab alone!

You can also try sliding your finger up the side of the cup (your finger between the cup and vaginal wall) and bend your finger when you reach the rim.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

This is totally dependent on the individual and whether you have secondary dysmenorrhea or similar. For many people, menstrual cups have to be changed much less regularly than tampons, so there is less faffing around in your sensitive area.

Some people take a few cycles to get used to the menstrual cup and work out how it works best for them. When a cup is property inserted (and the stem is appropriately trimmed!) you shouldn’t feel the cup inside you at all.

Sometimes the cup doesn’t unfold which might feel uncomfortable – rotating it a couple of times inside you should open it up.

If you have a low cervix or a cervix that moves particularly low during menstruation, the cup may exert pressure on the cervix and cause discomfort and even pain.

You don’t need to wait for your period to start before you can try out your menstrual cup – it’s perfectly OK to do a “dry-run” since menstrual cups wont dry you out in the same way that tampons do.

Category: Menstrual Cups

There are various ways to insert a cup – try them out and see what works for you.

You may not be able to get the menstrual cup to fit right the first time, but with a bit of practice you will be able to insert the cup like an expert. Make sure you read the instructions and try to relax as much as possible!

Here’s a Lunette video demonstrating 3 different folding styles:

  1. C-fold/heart fold
  2. Punch down fold/shell fold
  3. 7-fold or triangle fold

Spinning the cup a quarter turn once it’s inserted may help to make sure that the seal is good.

You may find it easier to put your legs wide apart whilst siting on the loo (if you’re wearing tights or trousers, pull them right down to your ankles!)

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most cups come in 2 sizes: a smaller one suitable for those aged under 25 or 30 who have never been pregnant, or a larger one suitable for those aged 25 or 30, or those who have been pregnant. You can also use the larger size if you have a heavier flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most menstrual cups are made from medical grade silicone, latex or TPE. Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

All cup brands are different so you should do your research and work out the best option for you.

You want to make sure that your cup is made of medical grade silicone and is latex and BPA-free. Cups that do not mention it in their packaging probably include some nasties, including plastic!

Give this quiz a go! https://putacupinit.com/quiz/

Category: Menstrual Cups

Load More

 

Menstrual Cups

Menstrual cups are soft, flexible cups made of silicone or latex rubber, that you fold and then insert just like a tampon. Instead of absorbing your blood, like a tampon or pad, the cup catches it and you can empty it down the toilet. Menstrual cups hold more blood than your average tampon so you shouldn’t need to empty it as regularly as you would change a tampon.  A menstrual cup should last you about 5 years and is perfect for travelling (who wants to carry boxes of tampons and pads around whilst on the move?).

91% of women who tried the menstrual cup said that they would continue to use the cup and recommend it to a friend. Menstrual cups cost £9 – £24.90 and will last you 5-10 years.

Mooncup have an advice line run by qualified medical health professionals – they’re happy to answer any questions/ work through problems with usage: advice@mooncup.co.uk or +44(0) 1273 673 845

Lunette: Lunette has a very good and responsive customer service so you can email them anytime at info@lunette.com.

There are also lots of useful information in their FAQs and blog. There are also loads of blogs, youtube videos and forums on this topic so google your question!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Like with any internal period product, there is a risk of TSS. But a clean, properly used menstrual cup means the chances are very small. Take good care of personal hygiene and always choose a trusted brand.

TSS is an infection caused by bacteria entering through wounds or mucous membrane. It is an extremely rare, potentially fatal disease occurring in those with or without a uterus, and children. TSS is usually connected with absorbent tampons.

SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:

  • sudden high fever
  • sore throat
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • dizziness
  • a rash resembling sunburn
  • muscle aches
  • fainting or blackouts

Early recognition and cure is vital, so if you have some of the symptoms mentioned above, remove the menstrual cup immediately, contact your doctor and express your concerns about the possibility of TSS.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes! Because menstrual cups don’t dry you out like tampons you can even do a ‘dry-run’ before your period starts if you like!

Here’s some tips from Lunette about first time use: https://www.lunette.com/blogs/news/teens-menstrual-cups-tips-for-first-time-use?p64=4

Category: Menstrual Cups

This will vary from brand to brand and depends on how well you take care of the cup. Some people will use their cup for up to 10 years and others prefer to change it yearly. Some discolouration is normal because blood is quite strong, but with good cleaning you can minimize this.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes you should properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

If you’re unable to boil your cup (some brands don’t recommend boiling anyway) then a sterilising tablet in a foldable cup (or any other cup/bowl) will do the job just as well:
https://www.nomoretaboo.org/store/RubyCup-Foldable-Steriliser-Cup-p60272081

Category: Menstrual Cups

Silicon is fairly inert and not associated with hormone disruption, unlike the additives in plastic and other chemicals and residues found in mainstream pads and tampons.

Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because of its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up. It’s very important that the cup is regularly and thoroughly washed using mechanical action to remove any biofilm from the surface.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes, you can. If you do use an IUD, consult with your doctor about cutting the strings as short as possible and monitor their length regularly during periods. If the strings seem longer than normal, it might be a sign that your IUD has moved.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Can I use a menstrual cup if my uterus has an unusual tilt or I have a low cervix?

The cervix is usually high in the vagina and the menstrual cup is placed low so the cervix remains above the cup. For many people, the cervix descends after giving birth; for others, it is simply situated low in the vagina. If you have a low cervix it may enter the interior of the cup which makes it more prone to leak. In some users, the cervix fits best inside the menstrual cup but for others the cup may exert pressure on the cervix that can cause discomfort and even pain.

The best way to evaluate the position of your cervix is by observing leakage — if you have experienced leakage even when the cup has been opened, make sure that the cup is significantly lower than the cervix.

If you haven’t experienced leakage and you have not located the cervix, there’s no need to hunt for it! You’re a woman whose cervix is so deep in the vagina that it doesn’t affect the use of the menstrual cup in any way.

If you have a titled uterus the cup may also be tilted, causing it to leak a little. Here is a video from Lunette about how to make sure your cup is its place!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes absolutely!

A menstrual cup is worn internally (and you don’t have that rogue tampon string to worry about!) and holds more volume than tampon.

Category: Menstrual Cups

No!

Category: Menstrual Cups

If your flow is very heavy or your cervix hangs very low when you’re menstruating you may find that the cup leaks a little. Leaks are more frequent for women whose cervix’ move lower during menstruation or if the cup has been inserted too high in the vagina, next to the cervix, or above it.

Remember to make sure the suction air holes are clear before reinserting your cup each time. Rotating the cup a couple of times will make sure that the cup has unfolded inside you.

To catch any small leaks you might want to wear a reusable pad or period pants in conjunction with the cup, especially when you’re trying it for the first few months and you’re still learning about your flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Cups can be messy when you start learning to use them, but once you’ve mastered the technique and worked out what’s best for you you can avoid any leaks or spills.

If your flow is heavy, you may find that blood pools in the bottom of the loo when you empty your cup, even after you’ve flushed. Use a toilet brush and flush again, and the red water should go!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Make sure your hands are clean and bring a reusable water bottle into the toilet with you so you can rinse your cup off if there’s no sink. You can also buy cup wipes but it’s not advised to use normal soap.

If you’re out for a shorter period of time wipe your cup clean with toilet paper or use a special disinfectant wipe like these: https://store.lunette.com/products/lunette-cupwipes.

Properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Menstrual cups should be cleaned before and after your cycle as well as rinsed after emptying.

Read the instructions that come with your cup – some will suggest boiling in a saucepan for between 5-10 minutes whereas others advise using sterilising tablets or cup cleanser.

Using normal soap is not advised because of the pH, the oils and the lack of a thorough clean in the nooks and crannies of the cup.

Category: Menstrual Cups

When you first start using the cup empty it every few hours and you’ll soon get an idea of how heavy your flow is and how often you’ll need to empty it. If your flow is very heavy you may need to empty it every couple of hours. If your flow is lighter, you may find you can go as long as 6-8 hours.

The capacity of a menstrual cup is usually 25 ml or 30 ml whereas the absorbing capacity of a tampon is 6-18 g.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Don’t worry! You’re not getting anything stuck in there. Removing your menstrual cup can be tricky at first, but we promise it will come naturally after a few tries.

Relax. Use your pelvic floor muscles to push down until you can get a firm grip on the stem of the cup.

Break the seal by pinching the bottom part of the cup until you feel or hear the suction release. Then, gently rock the cup from side to side while pulling down. Make sure that you do not pull the cup out by the tab alone!

You can also try sliding your finger up the side of the cup (your finger between the cup and vaginal wall) and bend your finger when you reach the rim.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

This is totally dependent on the individual and whether you have secondary dysmenorrhea or similar. For many people, menstrual cups have to be changed much less regularly than tampons, so there is less faffing around in your sensitive area.

Some people take a few cycles to get used to the menstrual cup and work out how it works best for them. When a cup is property inserted (and the stem is appropriately trimmed!) you shouldn’t feel the cup inside you at all.

Sometimes the cup doesn’t unfold which might feel uncomfortable – rotating it a couple of times inside you should open it up.

If you have a low cervix or a cervix that moves particularly low during menstruation, the cup may exert pressure on the cervix and cause discomfort and even pain.

You don’t need to wait for your period to start before you can try out your menstrual cup – it’s perfectly OK to do a “dry-run” since menstrual cups wont dry you out in the same way that tampons do.

Category: Menstrual Cups

There are various ways to insert a cup – try them out and see what works for you.

You may not be able to get the menstrual cup to fit right the first time, but with a bit of practice you will be able to insert the cup like an expert. Make sure you read the instructions and try to relax as much as possible!

Here’s a Lunette video demonstrating 3 different folding styles:

  1. C-fold/heart fold
  2. Punch down fold/shell fold
  3. 7-fold or triangle fold

Spinning the cup a quarter turn once it’s inserted may help to make sure that the seal is good.

You may find it easier to put your legs wide apart whilst siting on the loo (if you’re wearing tights or trousers, pull them right down to your ankles!)

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most cups come in 2 sizes: a smaller one suitable for those aged under 25 or 30 who have never been pregnant, or a larger one suitable for those aged 25 or 30, or those who have been pregnant. You can also use the larger size if you have a heavier flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most menstrual cups are made from medical grade silicone, latex or TPE. Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

All cup brands are different so you should do your research and work out the best option for you.

You want to make sure that your cup is made of medical grade silicone and is latex and BPA-free. Cups that do not mention it in their packaging probably include some nasties, including plastic!

Give this quiz a go! https://putacupinit.com/quiz/

Category: Menstrual Cups

Load More

 

Period Pants

Period pants are absorbent underwear that you can wash and reuse again for up to 2 years. Period pants come in a range of styles (including thong style!) and absorbencies. Some have inserts that you can remove and change as you would with a pad. Some people use these in conjunction with the menstrual cup or for overnight bleeding.

A pairs of period pants will cost you between £23 – £31 and each pair will last you at least 2 years.

Mooncup have an advice line run by qualified medical health professionals – they’re happy to answer any questions/ work through problems with usage: advice@mooncup.co.uk or +44(0) 1273 673 845

Lunette: Lunette has a very good and responsive customer service so you can email them anytime at info@lunette.com.

There are also lots of useful information in their FAQs and blog. There are also loads of blogs, youtube videos and forums on this topic so google your question!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Like with any internal period product, there is a risk of TSS. But a clean, properly used menstrual cup means the chances are very small. Take good care of personal hygiene and always choose a trusted brand.

TSS is an infection caused by bacteria entering through wounds or mucous membrane. It is an extremely rare, potentially fatal disease occurring in those with or without a uterus, and children. TSS is usually connected with absorbent tampons.

SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:

  • sudden high fever
  • sore throat
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • dizziness
  • a rash resembling sunburn
  • muscle aches
  • fainting or blackouts

Early recognition and cure is vital, so if you have some of the symptoms mentioned above, remove the menstrual cup immediately, contact your doctor and express your concerns about the possibility of TSS.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes! Because menstrual cups don’t dry you out like tampons you can even do a ‘dry-run’ before your period starts if you like!

Here’s some tips from Lunette about first time use: https://www.lunette.com/blogs/news/teens-menstrual-cups-tips-for-first-time-use?p64=4

Category: Menstrual Cups

This will vary from brand to brand and depends on how well you take care of the cup. Some people will use their cup for up to 10 years and others prefer to change it yearly. Some discolouration is normal because blood is quite strong, but with good cleaning you can minimize this.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes you should properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

If you’re unable to boil your cup (some brands don’t recommend boiling anyway) then a sterilising tablet in a foldable cup (or any other cup/bowl) will do the job just as well:
https://www.nomoretaboo.org/store/RubyCup-Foldable-Steriliser-Cup-p60272081

Category: Menstrual Cups

Silicon is fairly inert and not associated with hormone disruption, unlike the additives in plastic and other chemicals and residues found in mainstream pads and tampons.

Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because of its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up. It’s very important that the cup is regularly and thoroughly washed using mechanical action to remove any biofilm from the surface.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes, you can. If you do use an IUD, consult with your doctor about cutting the strings as short as possible and monitor their length regularly during periods. If the strings seem longer than normal, it might be a sign that your IUD has moved.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Can I use a menstrual cup if my uterus has an unusual tilt or I have a low cervix?

The cervix is usually high in the vagina and the menstrual cup is placed low so the cervix remains above the cup. For many people, the cervix descends after giving birth; for others, it is simply situated low in the vagina. If you have a low cervix it may enter the interior of the cup which makes it more prone to leak. In some users, the cervix fits best inside the menstrual cup but for others the cup may exert pressure on the cervix that can cause discomfort and even pain.

The best way to evaluate the position of your cervix is by observing leakage — if you have experienced leakage even when the cup has been opened, make sure that the cup is significantly lower than the cervix.

If you haven’t experienced leakage and you have not located the cervix, there’s no need to hunt for it! You’re a woman whose cervix is so deep in the vagina that it doesn’t affect the use of the menstrual cup in any way.

If you have a titled uterus the cup may also be tilted, causing it to leak a little. Here is a video from Lunette about how to make sure your cup is its place!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes absolutely!

A menstrual cup is worn internally (and you don’t have that rogue tampon string to worry about!) and holds more volume than tampon.

Category: Menstrual Cups

No!

Category: Menstrual Cups

If your flow is very heavy or your cervix hangs very low when you’re menstruating you may find that the cup leaks a little. Leaks are more frequent for women whose cervix’ move lower during menstruation or if the cup has been inserted too high in the vagina, next to the cervix, or above it.

Remember to make sure the suction air holes are clear before reinserting your cup each time. Rotating the cup a couple of times will make sure that the cup has unfolded inside you.

To catch any small leaks you might want to wear a reusable pad or period pants in conjunction with the cup, especially when you’re trying it for the first few months and you’re still learning about your flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Cups can be messy when you start learning to use them, but once you’ve mastered the technique and worked out what’s best for you you can avoid any leaks or spills.

If your flow is heavy, you may find that blood pools in the bottom of the loo when you empty your cup, even after you’ve flushed. Use a toilet brush and flush again, and the red water should go!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Make sure your hands are clean and bring a reusable water bottle into the toilet with you so you can rinse your cup off if there’s no sink. You can also buy cup wipes but it’s not advised to use normal soap.

If you’re out for a shorter period of time wipe your cup clean with toilet paper or use a special disinfectant wipe like these: https://store.lunette.com/products/lunette-cupwipes.

Properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Menstrual cups should be cleaned before and after your cycle as well as rinsed after emptying.

Read the instructions that come with your cup – some will suggest boiling in a saucepan for between 5-10 minutes whereas others advise using sterilising tablets or cup cleanser.

Using normal soap is not advised because of the pH, the oils and the lack of a thorough clean in the nooks and crannies of the cup.

Category: Menstrual Cups

When you first start using the cup empty it every few hours and you’ll soon get an idea of how heavy your flow is and how often you’ll need to empty it. If your flow is very heavy you may need to empty it every couple of hours. If your flow is lighter, you may find you can go as long as 6-8 hours.

The capacity of a menstrual cup is usually 25 ml or 30 ml whereas the absorbing capacity of a tampon is 6-18 g.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Don’t worry! You’re not getting anything stuck in there. Removing your menstrual cup can be tricky at first, but we promise it will come naturally after a few tries.

Relax. Use your pelvic floor muscles to push down until you can get a firm grip on the stem of the cup.

Break the seal by pinching the bottom part of the cup until you feel or hear the suction release. Then, gently rock the cup from side to side while pulling down. Make sure that you do not pull the cup out by the tab alone!

You can also try sliding your finger up the side of the cup (your finger between the cup and vaginal wall) and bend your finger when you reach the rim.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

This is totally dependent on the individual and whether you have secondary dysmenorrhea or similar. For many people, menstrual cups have to be changed much less regularly than tampons, so there is less faffing around in your sensitive area.

Some people take a few cycles to get used to the menstrual cup and work out how it works best for them. When a cup is property inserted (and the stem is appropriately trimmed!) you shouldn’t feel the cup inside you at all.

Sometimes the cup doesn’t unfold which might feel uncomfortable – rotating it a couple of times inside you should open it up.

If you have a low cervix or a cervix that moves particularly low during menstruation, the cup may exert pressure on the cervix and cause discomfort and even pain.

You don’t need to wait for your period to start before you can try out your menstrual cup – it’s perfectly OK to do a “dry-run” since menstrual cups wont dry you out in the same way that tampons do.

Category: Menstrual Cups

There are various ways to insert a cup – try them out and see what works for you.

You may not be able to get the menstrual cup to fit right the first time, but with a bit of practice you will be able to insert the cup like an expert. Make sure you read the instructions and try to relax as much as possible!

Here’s a Lunette video demonstrating 3 different folding styles:

  1. C-fold/heart fold
  2. Punch down fold/shell fold
  3. 7-fold or triangle fold

Spinning the cup a quarter turn once it’s inserted may help to make sure that the seal is good.

You may find it easier to put your legs wide apart whilst siting on the loo (if you’re wearing tights or trousers, pull them right down to your ankles!)

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most cups come in 2 sizes: a smaller one suitable for those aged under 25 or 30 who have never been pregnant, or a larger one suitable for those aged 25 or 30, or those who have been pregnant. You can also use the larger size if you have a heavier flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most menstrual cups are made from medical grade silicone, latex or TPE. Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

All cup brands are different so you should do your research and work out the best option for you.

You want to make sure that your cup is made of medical grade silicone and is latex and BPA-free. Cups that do not mention it in their packaging probably include some nasties, including plastic!

Give this quiz a go! https://putacupinit.com/quiz/

Category: Menstrual Cups

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Reusable Period Pads

Reusable pads are used in the same way that you’d use a disposable pad, but they aren’t squeaky or sticky and can be washed and reused again for years! Reusable pads come in a range of sizes, materials and patterns. Some people use these in conjunction with the menstrual cup or for overnight bleeding.

A set of reusable pads will cost you about £10 – £35 and some can last up to 10 years.

Mooncup have an advice line run by qualified medical health professionals – they’re happy to answer any questions/ work through problems with usage: advice@mooncup.co.uk or +44(0) 1273 673 845

Lunette: Lunette has a very good and responsive customer service so you can email them anytime at info@lunette.com.

There are also lots of useful information in their FAQs and blog. There are also loads of blogs, youtube videos and forums on this topic so google your question!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Like with any internal period product, there is a risk of TSS. But a clean, properly used menstrual cup means the chances are very small. Take good care of personal hygiene and always choose a trusted brand.

TSS is an infection caused by bacteria entering through wounds or mucous membrane. It is an extremely rare, potentially fatal disease occurring in those with or without a uterus, and children. TSS is usually connected with absorbent tampons.

SYMPTOMS INCLUDE:

  • sudden high fever
  • sore throat
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • dizziness
  • a rash resembling sunburn
  • muscle aches
  • fainting or blackouts

Early recognition and cure is vital, so if you have some of the symptoms mentioned above, remove the menstrual cup immediately, contact your doctor and express your concerns about the possibility of TSS.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes! Because menstrual cups don’t dry you out like tampons you can even do a ‘dry-run’ before your period starts if you like!

Here’s some tips from Lunette about first time use: https://www.lunette.com/blogs/news/teens-menstrual-cups-tips-for-first-time-use?p64=4

Category: Menstrual Cups

This will vary from brand to brand and depends on how well you take care of the cup. Some people will use their cup for up to 10 years and others prefer to change it yearly. Some discolouration is normal because blood is quite strong, but with good cleaning you can minimize this.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes you should properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

If you’re unable to boil your cup (some brands don’t recommend boiling anyway) then a sterilising tablet in a foldable cup (or any other cup/bowl) will do the job just as well:
https://www.nomoretaboo.org/store/RubyCup-Foldable-Steriliser-Cup-p60272081

Category: Menstrual Cups

Silicon is fairly inert and not associated with hormone disruption, unlike the additives in plastic and other chemicals and residues found in mainstream pads and tampons.

Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because of its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up. It’s very important that the cup is regularly and thoroughly washed using mechanical action to remove any biofilm from the surface.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes, you can. If you do use an IUD, consult with your doctor about cutting the strings as short as possible and monitor their length regularly during periods. If the strings seem longer than normal, it might be a sign that your IUD has moved.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Can I use a menstrual cup if my uterus has an unusual tilt or I have a low cervix?

The cervix is usually high in the vagina and the menstrual cup is placed low so the cervix remains above the cup. For many people, the cervix descends after giving birth; for others, it is simply situated low in the vagina. If you have a low cervix it may enter the interior of the cup which makes it more prone to leak. In some users, the cervix fits best inside the menstrual cup but for others the cup may exert pressure on the cervix that can cause discomfort and even pain.

The best way to evaluate the position of your cervix is by observing leakage — if you have experienced leakage even when the cup has been opened, make sure that the cup is significantly lower than the cervix.

If you haven’t experienced leakage and you have not located the cervix, there’s no need to hunt for it! You’re a woman whose cervix is so deep in the vagina that it doesn’t affect the use of the menstrual cup in any way.

If you have a titled uterus the cup may also be tilted, causing it to leak a little. Here is a video from Lunette about how to make sure your cup is its place!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Period blood is not smelly – it’s only when the blood oxidises and comes into contact with pads and tampons that it starts smelling.

If you’re worried about body odor, empty your cup more often. If you’re worried about cup odor wash the cup regularly.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Yes absolutely!

A menstrual cup is worn internally (and you don’t have that rogue tampon string to worry about!) and holds more volume than tampon.

Category: Menstrual Cups

No!

Category: Menstrual Cups

If your flow is very heavy or your cervix hangs very low when you’re menstruating you may find that the cup leaks a little. Leaks are more frequent for women whose cervix’ move lower during menstruation or if the cup has been inserted too high in the vagina, next to the cervix, or above it.

Remember to make sure the suction air holes are clear before reinserting your cup each time. Rotating the cup a couple of times will make sure that the cup has unfolded inside you.

To catch any small leaks you might want to wear a reusable pad or period pants in conjunction with the cup, especially when you’re trying it for the first few months and you’re still learning about your flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Cups can be messy when you start learning to use them, but once you’ve mastered the technique and worked out what’s best for you you can avoid any leaks or spills.

If your flow is heavy, you may find that blood pools in the bottom of the loo when you empty your cup, even after you’ve flushed. Use a toilet brush and flush again, and the red water should go!

Category: Menstrual Cups

Make sure your hands are clean and bring a reusable water bottle into the toilet with you so you can rinse your cup off if there’s no sink. You can also buy cup wipes but it’s not advised to use normal soap.

If you’re out for a shorter period of time wipe your cup clean with toilet paper or use a special disinfectant wipe like these: https://store.lunette.com/products/lunette-cupwipes.

Properly disinfect your cup before and after your period starts.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Menstrual cups should be cleaned before and after your cycle as well as rinsed after emptying.

Read the instructions that come with your cup – some will suggest boiling in a saucepan for between 5-10 minutes whereas others advise using sterilising tablets or cup cleanser.

Using normal soap is not advised because of the pH, the oils and the lack of a thorough clean in the nooks and crannies of the cup.

Category: Menstrual Cups

When you first start using the cup empty it every few hours and you’ll soon get an idea of how heavy your flow is and how often you’ll need to empty it. If your flow is very heavy you may need to empty it every couple of hours. If your flow is lighter, you may find you can go as long as 6-8 hours.

The capacity of a menstrual cup is usually 25 ml or 30 ml whereas the absorbing capacity of a tampon is 6-18 g.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Don’t worry! You’re not getting anything stuck in there. Removing your menstrual cup can be tricky at first, but we promise it will come naturally after a few tries.

Relax. Use your pelvic floor muscles to push down until you can get a firm grip on the stem of the cup.

Break the seal by pinching the bottom part of the cup until you feel or hear the suction release. Then, gently rock the cup from side to side while pulling down. Make sure that you do not pull the cup out by the tab alone!

You can also try sliding your finger up the side of the cup (your finger between the cup and vaginal wall) and bend your finger when you reach the rim.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

This is totally dependent on the individual and whether you have secondary dysmenorrhea or similar. For many people, menstrual cups have to be changed much less regularly than tampons, so there is less faffing around in your sensitive area.

Some people take a few cycles to get used to the menstrual cup and work out how it works best for them. When a cup is property inserted (and the stem is appropriately trimmed!) you shouldn’t feel the cup inside you at all.

Sometimes the cup doesn’t unfold which might feel uncomfortable – rotating it a couple of times inside you should open it up.

If you have a low cervix or a cervix that moves particularly low during menstruation, the cup may exert pressure on the cervix and cause discomfort and even pain.

You don’t need to wait for your period to start before you can try out your menstrual cup – it’s perfectly OK to do a “dry-run” since menstrual cups wont dry you out in the same way that tampons do.

Category: Menstrual Cups

There are various ways to insert a cup – try them out and see what works for you.

You may not be able to get the menstrual cup to fit right the first time, but with a bit of practice you will be able to insert the cup like an expert. Make sure you read the instructions and try to relax as much as possible!

Here’s a Lunette video demonstrating 3 different folding styles:

  1. C-fold/heart fold
  2. Punch down fold/shell fold
  3. 7-fold or triangle fold

Spinning the cup a quarter turn once it’s inserted may help to make sure that the seal is good.

You may find it easier to put your legs wide apart whilst siting on the loo (if you’re wearing tights or trousers, pull them right down to your ankles!)

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most cups come in 2 sizes: a smaller one suitable for those aged under 25 or 30 who have never been pregnant, or a larger one suitable for those aged 25 or 30, or those who have been pregnant. You can also use the larger size if you have a heavier flow.

Category: Menstrual Cups

Most menstrual cups are made from medical grade silicone, latex or TPE. Official advice is to opt for a silicone cup. Silicone is better than rubber because its smooth surface which doesn’t allow Staph bacteria to build up.

 

Category: Menstrual Cups

All cup brands are different so you should do your research and work out the best option for you.

You want to make sure that your cup is made of medical grade silicone and is latex and BPA-free. Cups that do not mention it in their packaging probably include some nasties, including plastic!

Give this quiz a go! https://putacupinit.com/quiz/

Category: Menstrual Cups

Load More

 

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